Latin America Courses

Spring 2019 Latin America Courses 

yellow tulips in front of Dahlgren Chapel

Georgetown University offers a wide variety of courses for students interested in Latin America: history, economics, architecture, literature, theology are some of the many fields through which students can explore the region. Click through the courses listed below to learn more about individual course requirements and descriptions.

Undergraduate-level Courses

Folk Rels Latin America – 35708 – THEO 031 – 01

Latinx Theologies – 35721 – THEO 156 – 01

Latin America II – 13456 – HIST 159 – (multiple sections)

The Black Diaspora in Brazil – 36123 – PORT 250 – 01

Latin America: Lit & Culture I – 15255 – SPAN 261 – 01

Latin America: Lit & Culture II – 16006 – SPAN 262 – 01

Literature & Society in Latin America – 15258 – SPAN 267 – 01

Global History: Frontiers – 33716 – HIST 305 – 01

Latin American Govt and Politics – 22605 – LASP 341 – 01

This course offers an introduction to the contemporary politics of Latin America.  The introductory section of the course considers historical dynamics and the foundation they laid for subsequent political and economic development in the region.

Hispanic Cinema – 34447 – SPAN 341 – 01

The Global South – 35622 – GOVT 343 – 02

Amazonia: People & Environment – 36124 – PORT 350 – 01

Graphic Novels of Latin America – 35973 – SPAN 351 – 01

Literature, Film, and Music of Mex/Mex Amer – 36614 – SPAN 382 – 01

Contemporary Latin American Novel – 36615 – SPAN 383 – 01

Latin Amer Studies Pro-Seminar – 13843 – LASP 495 – 01

Undergraduate/Graduate-level Courses

Latin American Art & Architecture – 36457 – ARTH 365 – 01

Latin American Government and Politics – 27839 – GOVT 455 – 01

Mexico, Mexicans, and the US – 35879 – HIST 458 – 01

Political Economy of Cities: Latin America & Asia – 31564 – GBUS 461 – 01

Indigenous Movements of Latin America – 35794 – LASP 487 – 01

This course provides a perspective on the uses of ethnic identity as a resource for grassroots social and political movements, economic development programs, and the broader processes of nation-building in Latin America.

Literature, Film, & Music of Central America – 35977 – SPAN 487 – 01

Development & Brazilian Experience – 34250 – LASP 492 – 01

This course will provide an in-depth and rigorous analysis of issues related to Brazilian development, articulating a solid theoretical foundation with concrete elements of the country’s experience.

Graduate-level Courses

Modern Cuba – 35796 – LASP 532 – 01

With special attention to Cuba’s changing hemispheric and global connections, this graduate seminar will allow students to explore the rich and often contentious history of modern Cuba from the early nineteenth century to the present, through common readings and individual projects.

US – Latin American Relations – 34252 – LASP 546 – 01

This course will focus on U.S. foreign policy in Latin America and the relationship between the U.S. and the other countries in the Hemisphere.

Journalism & Politics: Americas – 34253 – LASP 560 – 01

This course seeks to understand the interaction of journalism and politics in the Americas. At times, it will be a course on democratic theory and comparative politics, as we come to terms with democracy, authoritarianism, populism and other related phenomena. But it will also be a course on the theory and practice of journalism, with some formative texts in that field.

China Russia Politics in the Americas – 35797 – LASP 562 – 01

In this course, students will examine the effects of China’s engagement with the region; USSR and the Cold War in Latin America, as well as Russia’s recent return to the region under Putin. Additionally, students will analyze some historical and new links, such as the ones with EU countries, the Vatican, Japan, India, Israel and Iran.

Political Economy of Development: LatinAmerica – 34864 – LASP 575 – 01

This seminar aims to deepen understanding and appreciation for the historical complexities and major theoretical debates and substantive issues found in the Political Economy of Development (PED) of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).

Latin American Security – 35738 – SEST 587 – 01

Econ Problems of Latin America – 21766 – ECIL 617 – 61

Politics of Human Rights: Latin America in Comparison – 34256 – LASP 640 – 01

This advanced seminar will focus on the politics of human rights and the challenges of applying international human rights and humanitarian law in countries confronting major violations of both.  The primary regional focus of the course will be on Latin America, however the seminar will encourage cross-regional and comparative analysis with key cases in Africa, Asia, Middle East and Europe.

Econ Hist of Latin Amer – 35887 – HIST 652 – 01

Power/Culture in Modern Mexico – 35888 – HIST 655 – 01

Trade and Integration in the Americas – 35481 – LAWG 785 – 08

Human Rights and the Inter-American System – 22061 – LAWG 2020 – 11

Arbitration in Latin America – 33519 – LAWG 3051 – 09

Master’s Program Core Requirements

Culture & Power in Lat Amer – 18092 – LASP 502 – (two sections)

Culture and Power in Latin America explores the changing and contested constructions of identities and belief systems among the diverse peoples of Latin America. Emphasis is on the linked ways that power constitutes culture and that cultures construct powers, drawing on literary and popular texts, oral histories, film, etc.

Political Econ of Lat Amer – 16598 – LASP 504 – (two sections)

This seminar aims to deepen understanding and appreciation for the historical complexities and major theoretical debates and substantive issues found in the Political Economy of Development (PED) of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).

Capstone: Latin America – 34866 – LASP 701 – 01

The capstone for the M.A. in Latin American Studies is a three-credit course that provides graduate students with an opportunity to demonstrate their comprehensive, integrated and interdisciplinary knowledge about Latin America and the Caribbean applied to a specific analytical question, case study, policy issue, new opportunity, emerging challenge, or project chosen by students in their respective concentrations.